Mirror Support

E. A. & E. W. THAYER

Patented May 23, 1905


To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, EMMIE ALICE THAYER and EMILY WAITEE THAYER, citizens of the United States, and residents of Bellows Falls, in the State of Vermont, have made certain new and useful Improvements in Mirror-Supports, of which the following is a full, clear and exact description.

Ordinarily a lady is obliged to hold a hand-glass in one hand while attempting to arrange her coiffure before a mirror or see to the fit of her garment at the back, and hence has but one hand fee for attending to the work.

The object of this invention is the construction of a mirror and supporting devices by means of which a small mirror can be so held by suitable devices connected with her person as to enable her to use the same as she would a hand-glass and still have both hands free for attending to her toilet.

Referring to the drawings forming part of this specification, Figure 1 is a perspective view of the embodiment of our invention, showing the same connected with the person of a lady supposed to be using it. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the same, showing it not in use and with the small mirror turned to present its back. Fig. 3 is a detail plan view of the elongated loop through which the mirror-engaging spindle is passed.

The small mirror 1, composing a part of out arrangement, is preferably made from rather this glass for the sake of lightness and is mounted on a thin metallic back 2, suitably inclosing the edges of the mirror. Riveted, soldered, or otherwise secured to the rear of said back is a plate of metal 4, having a socket-groove 3 therein, within which is located the spindle 16 friction-tight. Said spindle is preferably formed as a continuation of the brace 15, the lower extremity of which is bent or headed to render it smooth and non-injurious to the fabric or flesh of the user's chest. Also friction-tight about said spindle is the coil 12, formed at the junction of and integral with the two arms 10 10', which are designed to connect with the ears of the user thereof, as shown in Fig. 1, the ends of said arms being formed with the hooks 11 for engagement with said ears. These arms are preferably curved somewhat, as indicated in Fig. 2, in order not to press against the cheek of the user, and said hooks are located substantially higher than the arms in order that the latter may come sufficiently below the eyes of the user when the hooks 11 are clasping her ears as not to interfere with the lines of vision. As shown in Fig. 3, said coil or loop 12 is considerably elongated, while snugly fitting laterally upon the spindle 16 for the purpose of permitting such spindle a swinging adjustment toward and from the user's eyes. The advantage of this is to enable the brace 15 by having its lower end varied in position up and down the user's chest to thereby swing said spindle to such an angle as will give the mirror an upward or downward cant and enable the user to view either the topmost feather of her hat, her collar, or even her skirt. The best way in which to form this elongated coil 12 is to first wind the wire of which it is composed upon a suitable cylindrical mandrel and afterward compress the coil to the width of interior desired in order to have it fit friction-tight clasp upon said spindle causes the mirror to remain at any horizontal angle to which it may be turned.

It is preferable to have the coil 12 give an inward resilient pressure to the arms 10 10' sufficient to bring the latter nearly together when not in use. This permits of the entire arrangement being put into a small compass in one plane, the mirror being turned on the spindle to lie in the same plane and the arms being brought wholly together. Hence the entire device can be packed in a space hardly thicker than a sheet of pasteboard. The other object in giving said arms an inward resilient pressure is to aid the hooks 112 in their grip upon the ears of the user, the same clasping the user's head rather tightly between them.

What we claim as our invention, and for which we desire Letters Patent, is as follows, to wit:

1. The combination with a mirror, or arms supporting the same constructed to be removably attachable to the head of the user thereof, and a brace loosely held at the free ends of said arms and constructed to rest against the chest of the user of the mirror; the upper end of said brace being provided with a spindle rigid therewith upon which said mirror rotatably mounted; said brace and spindle being constructed to swing said mirror shifting of the lower end of such brace upon the chest of the user.

2. The combination with a mirror, of a pair of wire arms supporting the same at their outer ends, and means for bracing said arms against depression of their outer ends; the inner end of each of said arms being each formed with a hook for engaging the ears of the user.

3. The combination with a mirror, of a pair of arms each formed for the support of engag-ing the ears of the user thereof, means at the outer ends of said arms for the support of said mirror, and a brace extending from said outer ends to the chest of the person using the mirror.

4. The combination of a mirror having a socket at its back, a spindle penetrating said socket, a brace integral with said spindle, and a pair of arms having a coil at their juncture penetrated by said spindle, and means at their inner ends for the engagement of the head of the user thereof.

5. The combination of a mirror having a socket at its back, a spindle penetrating said socket, a brace integral with said spindle, a pair of arms having at their inner ends means for engaging the head of the user thereof and at their juncture an elongated coil penetrated by said spindle.

6. The combination of a mirror having a socket at its back, a spindle penetrating said socket, a pair of arms adjustably holding said spindle at their outer ends and having ear-engaging hooks at their inner ends, and means for bracing said arms against depression.

7. The combination of a mirror, wire arms supporting said mirror having ear-engaging hooks at their inner ends, and means for bracing said arms against depression; said hooks rising above the level of said arms for the purpose of giving free vision to the user thereof.

8. The combination with a mirror, of a wire bent to form a pair of arms each having an ear -engaging hook at its end, and a spring-coil at the juncture, and a brace for said arms; said mirror being supported buy said arms, and said spring-coil being arranged to press said arms toward each other.

9. The combination of a mirror having a socket at its back, a spindle penetrating said socket, a brace integral with said spindle, and a pair of arms formed from spring-wire having ear-engaging hooks at their ends, and an elongated coil at their juncture penetrated by said spindle.

In testimony that we claim the foregoing invention we have hereunto set out hands this 19th day of November, 1904. Emmie Alice Thayer. Emily Waitee Thayer. Witnesses: Abbie T. Leonard, Eugene S. Leonard